Dredged to Excellence, 100 Years on the Houston Ship Channel

Houston History celebrates the Houston Ship Channel’s centennial.
The Fall 2014 issue explores the deep-water channel from its initial concept in the 1830s to one of the world’s largest ports today. The magazine also pays tribute to the men and women who make the Port of Houston a success, like lineman Bobby Kersey, shown on the cover, who has worked there for over half a century. Click on the “Continue Reading” link below for a description of the articles.

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Letter from the Editor – Southeast Houston

By Carroll Parrott Blue, Guest Editor University of Houston Research Professor Center for Public History “Home: A place that provides access to every opportunity America has to offer.”  – Anita Hill, Reimagining Equality: Stories of Gender, Race and Finding Home, epigram.  In the 1970s some Houstonians greeted integration’s promise of greater access to educational equality […]

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Palm Center: A Window into Southeast Houston

With the recent addition of the Southeast line to the METRORail network, the Greater Third Ward is geared for revitalizing changes. The new line extends from downtown to the Palms Center, a former shopping center located at the intersection of Griggs Road and Martin Luther King Boulevard.

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The Kuhlmann Family: Planting Roots for Future Generations

In 1836 young Johann Frederick Kuhlmann made his way from Germanto America, eventually landing at the port of New Orleans after one of his sea journeys. Remaining in New Orleans working in various jobs, he continuously heard stories about the newly established Republic of Texas and its capital, Houston. To satisfy his curiosity, he made a trip to Houston and liked what he saw: a bustling little town that might provide him a promising future.

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Neglected gully gets some love, and a benchmark

Kuhlman Gully is a quiet 1.09-mile tributary that flows into Brays Bayou. Cavanaugh Nweze remembers it from his childhood, “The Kuhlman Gully gave us many opportunities to play, to just get away from big city life, to skip rocks, and even sometimes to just get in trouble. . .

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MacGregor Park, A Gift to Houston

When people hear the name MacGregor Park they likely think of two notable Houstonians: Henry F. MacGregor, a businessman and philanthropist who helped shape Houston’s development in the first quarter of the twentieth century whose family donated the land for the park in his honor, and Olympian Zina Garrison, who became a world champion tennis player through John Wilkerson’s MacGregor Park Junior Tennis Program in the 1970s and who returned to Houston to encourage others to take up the game.

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The Life and Legacy of Overseer R. L. Braziel

On November 9, 2005, Ruby Lee Braziel, my grandmother, suffered a mild stroke in her home and was rushed to Houston’s St. Luke’s Hospital. When I returned home from school, my father, Darwin Allen Sr., told me what had happened – sad news that any grandson would hate to hear.

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