Discovering Maritime Monuments from World War I

Two historically important seafaring monuments dating back to World War I (1914-1919) can be found in the Greater Houston area. The grander of the two is the Battleship Texas BB-35, saved from the scrap yard by donations from the people of Texas, and brought here for retirement. Few people realize, however, another World War I monument rests in Galveston Bay.

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Medal of Honor Recipients from the Houston Area

The Medal of Honor is the highest military award granted to members of the United States Armed Forces. Over 3,400 medals have been conferred upon deserving military personnel who “distinguish[ed] themselves through conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty.”

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In the Service of Their Country: UH Connections

From the University of Houston’ s first U. S. Navy Reserve Vocational School to the thousands of service men and women who have attended UH under the G.I. Bill for the past seventy years, UH has a proud tradition of students, faculty, and staff who have served in the armed forces.

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On Track: The Museum of the American G.I.

A cannon barrel aimed at the sky breaks the gently sloping plains, the steel frame of a behemoth of a tank standing guard as sentinel. Nearby, a platoon of men works frantically to restore another tank: the sound of mechanical clanging, of repair duties, of engines rumbling, and cannons firing rises through the air. Some men are wounded; a mechanic working on the tank had his finger badly mauled by metal as he worked.

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Warbirds Rising: Lone Star Flight Museum

In November, 2008, just two months after Hurricane Ike devastated Galveston, historian William H. Kellar drove to the island to interview Larry Gregory, president of the Lone Star Flight Museum and the Texas Aviation Hall of Fame, for a “Conversations with…” feature that appeared in the Spring 2009 issue of Houston History magazine. The museum, which first opened in 1990, and its priceless collection of mainly World War II aircraft, suffered terrible damage from the effects of the hurricane.

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Art without Artifice: The Menil Collection

Tucked away in the heart of a Houston suburb, among generous green park space and snug, grey-clapboard bungalows, the unexpected is made manifest in the Menil Collection. An internationally-renowned arts destination identified only by a small, inconspicuous sign, the Menil is a recognized Houston landmark that, for all its importance, still bears a remarkable sense of simplicity.

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Putting a Stamp on Houston

Nineteen forty-five was a year to remember on the national, state, and local level. For our country, it marked, of course, the end of the worst war the world had ever endured. For our state, it saw Texans celebrating the centennial of statehood. And for Houston stamp collectors, it witnessed the founding of the Houston Philatelic Society.

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Maxim’s Introduces Fine Dining to Houston

In 1949, amid the city’s booming economy and population growth, the Peacock Grill opened— giving Houstonians a new kind of culinary experience. Max Manuel and Camille Bermann opened their fine dining establishment in downtown Houston filling the niche for continental cuisine.

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