A Life of Activism: Maria Jimenez

In May 1957, Maria Jimenez arrived in Houston, having just left her native Coahuila in Mexico to reunite with her father. Her family settled in a small Magnolia Park home near Maria’s school, Franklin Elementary. There, as a first grader, she experienced her first dose of anti-Mexican sentiments. Within the halls, classrooms, and playgrounds, school officials forbid Maria and other students to speak Spanish lest they face expulsion.

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Marching for Pride: The History of the Houston Pride Parade

Perhaps a parade seems rather insignificant, but that is not the case and never was for the Houston Pride Parade. It represents a beacon of hope—a light in a dark place. It is a visual representation of the Houston LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender) community’s existence and a reminder that no member of the LGBT community stands alone in the fight for recognition.

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Fragas: A Hundred Years in the East End

The decedents of Felix A. Fraga and Angela Zamarron became business owners, judges, and elected officials, all well known in the East End and the larger Houston area. Growing up, I had heard bits and pieces of our family’s history, but some of the stories seemed to be hearsay. It became my mission to paint a complete picture of our history.

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A Round Trip back to Houston

Who would have ever thought that a valise thrown onto burning trash heap outside a house being torn down in Houston would be rescued by an unsuspecting passerby and turn out to hold a historic collection of nineteenth century photographs? Well, it happened, and this is the story!

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Holocaust Museum Houston and Danish Fishing Boat: Never Forget

The extermination of six million Jews during World War II was a horrific event that will be remembered forever. In the city of Houston stands a distinguished building that has engraved within its walls the memories and stories of some of the survivors. The Holocaust Museum Houston’s mission is to remember those who perished in the Holocaust; to educate people about the dangers of hatred, prejudice, violence, and apathy; and to instill hope by working to repair the world.

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The Peter Beste and Lance Scott Walker Houston Rap Collection

From hip-hop music’s earliest days, Houston has contributed greatly to the genre’s development. In the 1990s Houston icon DJ Screw gave us “chopped and screwed,” arguably the city’s most notable contribution, but Houston can claim many others. A handful of Houston-area rappers, like Geto Boys, Bun B and Pimp C of UGK, and Paul Wall, have risen to national prominence, but the overarching contributions of Houston to the rap scene often remain overlooked. To preserve and highlight Houston’s rich hip hop legacy, the University of Houston Libraries Special Collections began collecting primary source materials on the genre in 2010 when curator Julie Grob established Houston Hip Hop as a collecting area.

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Houston’s New 8th Wonder

A battle rages today about tearing down the “8th Wonder of the World,” a nickname coined by Judge Roy Hofheinz for the Astrodome during its construction in the 1960s. But now another 8th Wonder stands in Old Chinatown east of downtown Houston in today’s EaDo (East Downtown) district.

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